A Gnome Abroad – Crete

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I have many fond memories of times when I visited Crete. The Pizzaland in Chania doesnR;t have fond memories of the times I visited Crete, though.

34 Comments:

  1. Actually, Akrotiri or Akrotirio means cape, so there are many places with that name.

  2. Interesting bit about the Knossos labyrinth: the guide told us that the steps in the palace were designed in such a way that they wouldn’t be tiring. The steps are not too steep and precisely the right dimensions to not exercise much stress on knees etc. To this day, 20 years later, I still evaluate modern staircases, steps, etc to those brilliant ancient standards.

  3. Unlimited pizza is a theory and not a fact. Great story, Jingles. I knew this Gnome Abroad stuff was going to be great to have in the backround.

  4. I was so happy to see you flyby Santorini, it’s such a recognisable island.

  5. For what it’s worth, the Battle of Crete did provide one of the great quotations in British naval history, by Admiral Cunningham when his fleet was taking losses from the Luftwaffe.

    “It takes three years to build a new ship. It will take three hundred to build a new tradition. The evacuation will continue.”

    • Didn’t he afterwards regret sending the last wave of ships for evacuations as it cost him two cruisers?

    • @Lavrentivs Why is there always some arsehole either trying to be smart or to bring something down, especially if its British.

    • That quote came from another admiral at Dunkirk, if I remember correctly.

    • @PhotoIsca On 30 May 1941, in a letter to the First Sea Lord, Sir Dudley Pound, Cunningham wrote, “The sending back of Gloucester and Fiji to Greyhound was another grave error and cost us those two ships. They were practically out of ammunition, but even had they been full up I think they would have gone. The Commanding Officer of Fiji told me that the air over Gloucester was black with planes.”

  6. Crete was the final straw, but another interesting fact about the German paratroopers and their transport is that they had already lost hundreds(a good bit over 300) of transports during the invasion of the Netherlands. There were roads and airfields where the ground was covered with ruined planes because the Dutch had inserted poles into the ground on likely landing spots.

    • Poor Polish people getting shoved into the ground :(((((

    • First time I hear that. I know the German para’s got lot of resistance from Dutch troops send for retaliation. (poles ? didn’t hear about that)
      Anti-aircraf as well as Dutch air-force, not so much and as far there was, for a greatest deal outdated, so of just limited use !!!
      Well, Dutch, and, after the recession, didn’t spend to much money into that kind of defenses. They concentrated (as partly in former ages) defense along (old) fortresses around Holland (is the west), combined with the idea to flood the lands before those bounders, defense of the Ridgeline of Utrechtse Heuvelrug (combined with bunkers and reserves for counter-attack) and in 1st place the rivers Maas and IJssel, bunkers on west-banks. But before that Dutch counted on being neutral (did help in WOI) and the agreement with Brits, but formal the French to send military help if being invaded by the Germans, wich the French indeed did, in the very south.
      But to little, to late, because The Netherlands were overrun within 5 days !!! (capitulation because the Germans threatened to bombard more cities than just Rotterdam). Short story, cut very short indeed, but just to indicate that Netherlands didn’t hinder the Germans to much !!!
      About the item, I don’t think the Germans did lose many planes in the Netherlands.

    • @vanvan22 Considering they lost somewhere between 135-400 KIA, 1200 elite airlanding troops shipped off to Britain as POW before the surrender, and 182 transport planes destroyed I’d say the Dutch army inflicted some serious losses to their airlanding arm

  7. I can heartily recommend ALL of Antony Beevor’s books. He is a genius.

  8. I love these virtual tours, due to family reasons I will never leave the shores of England,so this is a wonderful way to love the world through someone else’s eyes.many many thanks Jingles.

  9. Went to Crete on deployment(USN) back in 2017 and I have very fond memories of this place. Speaking of good food the Gryos there have ruined me forever, nothing else comes close. That sleepy Mediterranian vibe never got old the whole time. Loved the video Jingles!

    • Oh god, I have only had a Gyro once! I visited a Greek pub in Michigan and they had this wrap they called a Gyro which was awesome with the dipping sauce they gave you! I wish I could visit other countries and sample the local food like Anthony Bourdain from No Limits TV show!! That would be scary fun!

  10. braintransplantdonor

    Brings back memories of our trip to Crete in 2001 – visits to Suda Bay cemetery, Maleme airfield, Hora Sfakion on the south coast (from where the Allied troops were evacuated) and, most memorably, the village of Galatas where the NZ Division had its HQ. It was a typically stinking hot day so the wife and I went into a little taverna in the village square to get a couple of cold ones. The bloke behind the bar was probably in his 60s and if he wasn’t half-Maori then I would be very surprised. He noticed we both had Siver Fern emblems on our day packs so it ended up us not paying for drinks the whole afternoon. Great country, fabulous people.

  11. The collapse of the massive underwater dome, which was created by the void of material moved by the eruption, caused the tsunami according to most recent findings

  12. When we were on a holiday in Rethymnon in Crete you could go on a day trip with boat over to Santorini as well. Good way to check 2 nice boxes of the list in one go.

  13. I can’t believe you mentioned Akrotiri without bringing up the fact that it’s one of the inspirations for Plato’s Atlantis myth. Or that the tsunamis reached the Nile delta and quite possibly influenced many flood myths in that region as well

  14. Fascinating tour! As someone is a studier and student of history and archaeology, this stuff always gets me interested and excited! Thank you for the video, Jingles!

  15. Jingles, come on now. What more could you ask for?
    Wine, women & song, of course!

    Jokes aside, Jingles, I’m loving these little tours and history lessons!

  16. The Cretan tourist board will be posting your tickets any day now Jingles, in all seriousness Crete is epic!

  17. Giuseppe's Gaming - Twinfinite

    Speaking of Jingles-friendly cities size and scope-wise, I have a feeling that seeing the ‘ol gnome visit Tokyo and hearing his reactions would be the pinnacle of entertainment. 😂

    Something to think about when the world reopens to non-simulated visits. Great video as usual, Jingles. I absolutely enjoy this series.

  18. I absolutely loved Crete. As an ex soldier, (sorry Jingles), I visited the beautifully kept war graves, where both German and Allied troops are buried. There is also a very touching memorial at the harbour, commemorating those lost at sea.

  19. Crete is my absolute favorite travel destination in Europe. Especially the west coast, which is far less developed and not as much swarming with tourists ^^

  20. “That is not military issue, Airman. What sort of uniform is that?”

    “Cretan camouflage, sir. If you want to blend in with a crowd of drunken Greeks, there’s nothing better.”

    “That is humor. I recognize that.”

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